BBQ Grilled Rabbit
Rabbit is best cooked on the BBQ grill whole with the ribcage split and flattened. Add your favorite barbecue sauce or just some simple olive oil and herbs then grill whole for about 30-40 minutes. Rest, then chop and serve to your happy guests for a high protein, lean alternative to chicken this grilling season!
Servings Prep Time
8servings 5minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
40minutes 10minutes
Servings Prep Time
8servings 5minutes
Cook Time Passive Time
40minutes 10minutes
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Heat your BBQ to medium high. While it heats, Cut the rabbit’s rib cage then press down flat. The ribs may pop out of the spine or break, either is fine.
  2. Spread half of your marinade on the inside of the rabbit.
  3. Lay your rabbit on the grill, marinade side down. Turn heat to low and cover. You want your grill to be heated at around 425 degrees. Set your timer for 15-20 minutes. Don’t forget to grill that delicious liver!
  4. After 15-20 minutes, coat the top side of the rabbit with half the remaining sauce and eat the liver as an appetizer. (trust me: rabbit liver is super mild and delicious!)
  5. Flip the rabbit longways (so the hindlegs are now where the forelegs were) and coat with the last of the sauce. Now is a good time to add tender grilling veggies like zucchini or peppers.
  6. Cover grill and cook another 15-20 minutes until juices run clear and thigh reads 160 degrees.
  7. Let the rabbit rest under foil off heat for 10 minutes.
  8. Chop into 6 chunks and let your guest choose their favorite piece! Remember that rabbit is more filling than chicken so a little goes a long way. 🙂
Recipe Notes

Rabbit has a slightly sweet flavor and pairs really well with plum sauce, but any of your favorite bbq sauce will do. Because rabbit is lean and lacks fatty skin, you’ll get fewer flame ups from fat catching on fire. A little char is nice, but the key is to put the rabbit on a hot grill then turn it down to cook low. Rabbit is best cooked on the BBQ grill whole with the ribcage split and flattened vs cut up before grilling: the loins and thighs can really dry out if cooked parted up first. Grab your cleaver to chop the rabbit up into servings after it has rested.